An Alcoholic Drink That Could Actually Prevent Hangover

Quenching a hard earned thirst with a big cold beer just got better for you, thanks to the work of some clever Australian scientists.

Many a Sunday morning has involved millions of people all over the world wishing they hadn't had quite so much to drink. For many, the morning after a big night has always meant one big hangover. Now, however, Australian scientists believe they have solved this problem by creating rehydrating beer.

Finally! An Alcoholic Drink That May Help Prevent HangoversNutrition experts at the Griffith Health Institute in Australia say they've removed many of the dehydrative properties of beer, which cause the hangover.

In order to create a more hydrating beer, the scientists added electrolytes (a common ingredient in sports drinks). That way, drinkers can enjoy their alcoholic beverage, while still staying refreshed.

Electrolytes are basically just minerals in the body that bind to compounds to create salts such as sodium. When the body is dehydrated it loses electrolytes, which make one feel lethargic and unwell after a night of drinking.

The trade-off, of course, is that the hydrating beer has less alcohol. In each case, though, the scientists claim that the alterations did not affect the taste of any of the beers.

As part of the study, the researchers modified two commercial beers, one regular strength and one light beer. They then gave them to volunteers who had worked up a sweat after exercise to test fluid recovery. The researchers concluded the hydrating beer was one-third more effective with respect to hydration compared to a normal beer.

Professor Ben Desbrow who was in charge of the study said it was more effective to tell people how to minimise dehydration than telling them not to drink.

"If you're going to live in the real world, you can either spend your time telling people what they shouldn't do, or you can work on ways of reducing the danger of some of these socialised activities," he said.

The new super beer paves the way for products to be developed that could reduce the likelihood of the dreaded hangover; so it's a triumphant day for beer drinkers everywhere.

The results of the hydrating beer research were published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism earlier this year, but beer fans will likely have to wait some time for the electrolyte-filled brews to hit shelves.

Share on Google+
Articles You Might Like


This site's content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. | Terms of Service